Archiving Living History

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I want to capture the living history of our local community, and make these resources accessible to the public. These faces represent so many stories that want to be heard. Click on somebody and hear their story!

Lou Ann Parsons was assigned to work near Port Elizabeth, South Africa in the 1950s. People were killed and YWCA leaders disappeared so that church leaders became “a voice for hope,” a life hub holding workshops and preparing people with training for leadership. She used spiritual analysis to discern “what must we do?” With apartheid controlling life in South Africa in the ‘70s, the oneness of all peoples came together with Bishop Tutu. Hope arrived with a new Bill of Rights, which included women. In 2012, 72% of South Africans voted in their election with no violence, with freedom to have a voice, and access to advanced education.

Lou Ann Parsons was assigned to work near Port Elizabeth, South Africa in the 1950s. People were killed and YWCA leaders disappeared so that church leaders became “a voice for hope,” a life hub holding workshops and preparing people with training for leadership. She used spiritual analysis to discern “what must we do?” With apartheid controlling life in South Africa in the ‘70s, the oneness of all peoples came together with Bishop Tutu. Hope arrived with a new Bill of Rights, which included women. In 2012, 72% of South Africans voted in their election with no violence, with freedom to have a voice, and access to advanced education.

— 9 months ago
#civil rights movement  #churches in south africa  #faith journey  #righteousness  #liberation movement  #justice  #congregational church  #protest  #aparteid  #poverty  #police brutality 
Charles Bayer has dedicated himself to a lifetime of Christian ministry. He shared his wisdom and knowledge as a professor on the ecumenical faculty of the theological school in Melbourne, Australia.

Charles Bayer has dedicated himself to a lifetime of Christian ministry. He shared his wisdom and knowledge as a professor on the ecumenical faculty of the theological school in Melbourne, Australia.

— 9 months ago
#civil rights movement  #ecumenical faculty  #christian ministry 
Robert “Bob” Traer was born in 1943 in Kalamazoo, Michigan. He met turmoil in the 1960’s with the Vietnam War, the Cuban Missile crisis, the Cold War, revolt against racial and sexual discrimination, and the Civil Rights Movement led by Martin Luther King, Jr. A nation filled with hatred and danger was created by: racial tension resulting in the Ku Klux Klan burning crosses in black neighborhoods, bombing churches, the hostile atmosphere of the police and courts, the assassinations of civil rights leaders and President John F. Kennedy. During Traer’s junior year, at Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, he joined the Civil Rights Movement by living in a black community with hostile, racial barriers with no crossing of white boundaries in Chicago. He volunteered to work in Benton County, Mississippi to enforce federal laws for the integration of schools and to register black voters. With no physical protection but the federal courts, the schools were integrated and the black voters registered. While attending Divinity School at the University of Chicago, Bob joined a civil rights march in, Marquette Park, Illinois, a strictly white area, to demonstrate the right of black people to live there. They were bombarded with bricks and their cars were burnt to ashes, which publicized the malicious racism still prevalent in the North.

Robert “Bob” Traer was born in 1943 in Kalamazoo, Michigan. He met turmoil in the 1960’s with the Vietnam War, the Cuban Missile crisis, the Cold War, revolt against racial and sexual discrimination, and the Civil Rights Movement led by Martin Luther King, Jr. A nation filled with hatred and danger was created by: racial tension resulting in the Ku Klux Klan burning crosses in black neighborhoods, bombing churches, the hostile atmosphere of the police and courts, the assassinations of civil rights leaders and President John F. Kennedy. During Traer’s junior year, at Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, he joined the Civil Rights Movement by living in a black community with hostile, racial barriers with no crossing of white boundaries in Chicago. He volunteered to work in Benton County, Mississippi to enforce federal laws for the integration of schools and to register black voters. With no physical protection but the federal courts, the schools were integrated and the black voters registered. While attending Divinity School at the University of Chicago, Bob joined a civil rights march in, Marquette Park, Illinois, a strictly white area, to demonstrate the right of black people to live there. They were bombarded with bricks and their cars were burnt to ashes, which publicized the malicious racism still prevalent in the North.

— 9 months ago
#civil rights movement  #revolt  #racial discrimination  #turmoil of 1960's  #Ku Klux Klan  #John F. Kennedy  #racial segregation of neighborhoods  #integration of Mississippi schools  #voting rights for African-Americans  #racism in Chicago 
Louilyn Hargett

was born in 1933 to a large African-American family in Lancaster, South Carolina. Little did she know that her world was full of racial animosity and prejudice.  “In her words, ‘getting angry only takes up unnecessary energy.’”  Louilyn believed that “everyone is capable of continuing to grow and learn.” She was trained by Methodist missionaries in education, religion, and love, “to remove the obstacles to a life of learning, joy, and fulfillment and spiritual growth.” After college, at age 19, she married future civil rights leader, Dr. James Hargett. The couple moved to Boston to continue their studies, hers in psychology at Boston University and his at Yale Divinity School, where they met Martin Luther King, Jr. who was also working on his Ph.D. Later James Hargett was named West Coast representative of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. In 1955 they moved to Honolulu, Hawaii where he was a pastor and she was a full-time mother of three. Louilyn’s work began in the Montessori school programs where she continued for 35 years as a Montessori teacher, administrator, Board member, and Vice President of Professional Development for “the maximization of human potential.” In 1975, she completed her doctorate in theoretical education at Rutgers University. Louilyn was chosen as an educator to study education in the new Republic of China. She wrote a 150 page study, Physical Aggression and Altruism in Young Children, which refuted Piaget’s theory that young children are egocentric. Her motivation in education aligned with Montessori principles: set no limits to academic potential. Louilyn and James Hargett supported Dr. King, Civil Rights, and non-violence who always reminded individuals to act through “compassion and love” with support and resources to increase our potential for learning.

Louilyn Hargett

was born in 1933 to a large African-American family in Lancaster, South Carolina. Little did she know that her world was full of racial animosity and prejudice.  “In her words, ‘getting angry only takes up unnecessary energy.’”  Louilyn believed that “everyone is capable of continuing to grow and learn.” She was trained by Methodist missionaries in education, religion, and love, “to remove the obstacles to a life of learning, joy, and fulfillment and spiritual growth.” After college, at age 19, she married future civil rights leader, Dr. James Hargett. The couple moved to Boston to continue their studies, hers in psychology at Boston University and his at Yale Divinity School, where they met Martin Luther King, Jr. who was also working on his Ph.D. Later James Hargett was named West Coast representative of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. In 1955 they moved to Honolulu, Hawaii where he was a pastor and she was a full-time mother of three. Louilyn’s work began in the Montessori school programs where she continued for 35 years as a Montessori teacher, administrator, Board member, and Vice President of Professional Development for “the maximization of human potential.” In 1975, she completed her doctorate in theoretical education at Rutgers University. Louilyn was chosen as an educator to study education in the new Republic of China. She wrote a 150 page study, Physical Aggression and Altruism in Young Children, which refuted Piaget’s theory that young children are egocentric. Her motivation in education aligned with Montessori principles: set no limits to academic potential. Louilyn and James Hargett supported Dr. King, Civil Rights, and non-violence who always reminded individuals to act through “compassion and love” with support and resources to increase our potential for learning.

— 9 months ago
#civil rights movement  #Montessori  #human potential  #early childhoold education  #education in China  #no academic limits  #non-violence 
Reverend Dr. James Hargett is the epitome of African-American excellence, born in Greensboro, North Carolina in 1930, as the son of an educated black minister. His support came from the black community through a Windsor Community center for blacks, with sports facilities, and superior institutions all in one complex, which encouraged him to attend Johnson C. Smith University and obtain his Ph.D. in religion from Yale Divinity School. James began his career as a minister and seeker of racial and social justice. Dr. Hargett served the Church of the Crossroads in Honolulu, Hawaii from 1955-1958, consisting mainly of Japanese, Chinese, and Philipino congregants. He spread the gospel to rural Hawaii as the first black person they knew, performing many weddings and youth services. Returning to California, Dr. Hargett accepted a position as Minister to the United Church of Christ in Los Angeles in 1958, and as West Coast Convener of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the premier leaders in the Civil Right Movement. In this position, he was in charge of all SCLC meetings on the west coast, working with Dr. King and Malcolm X to cure social injustice. James held many ministerial positions along with his Civil Rights work in Chicago, New York, and New Jersey. He traveled to Africa, with nineteen ministers, and returned teaching historic black religion, including hand-clapping with singing where there was no other instrument.

Reverend Dr. James Hargett is the epitome of African-American excellence, born in Greensboro, North Carolina in 1930, as the son of an educated black minister. His support came from the black community through a Windsor Community center for blacks, with sports facilities, and superior institutions all in one complex, which encouraged him to attend Johnson C. Smith University and obtain his Ph.D. in religion from Yale Divinity School. James began his career as a minister and seeker of racial and social justice. Dr. Hargett served the Church of the Crossroads in Honolulu, Hawaii from 1955-1958, consisting mainly of Japanese, Chinese, and Philipino congregants. He spread the gospel to rural Hawaii as the first black person they knew, performing many weddings and youth services. Returning to California, Dr. Hargett accepted a position as Minister to the United Church of Christ in Los Angeles in 1958, and as West Coast Convener of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the premier leaders in the Civil Right Movement. In this position, he was in charge of all SCLC meetings on the west coast, working with Dr. King and Malcolm X to cure social injustice. James held many ministerial positions along with his Civil Rights work in Chicago, New York, and New Jersey. He traveled to Africa, with nineteen ministers, and returned teaching historic black religion, including hand-clapping with singing where there was no other instrument.

— 9 months ago
#civil rights movement  #education essential  #greensboro north carolina  #racial justice  #social change  #hawaii's first black pastor  #convener of southern christian leadership conference  #civil rights  #marches  #dr. king 
Eleonore Powell, born in Manhattan, New York City, into a dysfunctional family on June 12, 1917. At age five she was left at an orphanage where she developed inner strength and open-mindedness in her religious participation. Eleonore studied nursing at Hunter College. She married a fellow student, Oliver Powell, and supported him through his studies at Union Seminary. They worked for the church and the United Christian Youth Movement in the 1930s, which served 42 Protestant denominations. Oliver was co-chair with Dorothy Height, a longtime civil rights leader. While Eleonore worked in New York City, Boston, and Chicago, where integration, voting, housing, and movement outside the Black Belt were denied. They marched many times with Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X. Eleonore finished her nutrition degree at Rosary College. She sought for the end of discrimination in the LGBT movement where her daughter was active, and they spoke together at many colleges. Eleonore remembers that she was used to turmoil. She liked trying new things and understanding others with a passion to serve.

Eleonore Powell, born in Manhattan, New York City, into a dysfunctional family on June 12, 1917. At age five she was left at an orphanage where she developed inner strength and open-mindedness in her religious participation. Eleonore studied nursing at Hunter College. She married a fellow student, Oliver Powell, and supported him through his studies at Union Seminary. They worked for the church and the United Christian Youth Movement in the 1930s, which served 42 Protestant denominations. Oliver was co-chair with Dorothy Height, a longtime civil rights leader. While Eleonore worked in New York City, Boston, and Chicago, where integration, voting, housing, and movement outside the Black Belt were denied. They marched many times with Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X. Eleonore finished her nutrition degree at Rosary College. She sought for the end of discrimination in the LGBT movement where her daughter was active, and they spoke together at many colleges. Eleonore remembers that she was used to turmoil. She liked trying new things and understanding others with a passion to serve.

— 9 months ago
#civil rights movement  #religion education orphanage  #united christian youth movement  #rosary college  #chicago civil rights marches  #LGBT civil rights 
Wayne “Chris” Hartmire combined his Christian upbringing and his desire for social justice in his work with César Chávez and the Farm Workers Movement in the biggest labor struggle of the 1960s. He fought for the rights denied to Mexican farm workers, including economic and civil rights. Chris was born in 1932 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and was trained by his mother and the Presbyterian Church, which said that it was “more blessed to give than to receive” (Acts 20:35). He studied civil engineering at Princeton University followed by studying for the ministry at Union Theological Seminary. Chris worked in East Harlem until his wife was physically assaulted. They moved to California where Chris took a job as Director of California Migrant Ministry with César Chávez, organizing migrant farm workers who had no legislation to protect their civil rights. The farm workers were overworked, underpaid with no affordable housing or education living always under the fear of deportation. César Chávez and Chris worked together in the Community Service Organization (CSO) to form a farm workers’ union. Chris supplied the financial support and the ministry to help organize strikes, boycotts, and church support, changing the course of history. Chris and César Chávez utilized collective action toward a common goal. A community led by God, all shouting the same message, can create a just society to end suffering here on Earth. 
Click the links below to hear his interview
https://soundcloud.com/archiving-living-history/chris-hartmire-interview (Introduction)
https://soundcloud.com/archiving-living-history/chris-hartmire-interview-track (Track 2)

Wayne “Chris” Hartmire combined his Christian upbringing and his desire for social justice in his work with César Chávez and the Farm Workers Movement in the biggest labor struggle of the 1960s. He fought for the rights denied to Mexican farm workers, including economic and civil rights. Chris was born in 1932 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and was trained by his mother and the Presbyterian Church, which said that it was “more blessed to give than to receive” (Acts 20:35). He studied civil engineering at Princeton University followed by studying for the ministry at Union Theological Seminary. Chris worked in East Harlem until his wife was physically assaulted. They moved to California where Chris took a job as Director of California Migrant Ministry with César Chávez, organizing migrant farm workers who had no legislation to protect their civil rights. The farm workers were overworked, underpaid with no affordable housing or education living always under the fear of deportation. César Chávez and Chris worked together in the Community Service Organization (CSO) to form a farm workers’ union. Chris supplied the financial support and the ministry to help organize strikes, boycotts, and church support, changing the course of history. Chris and César Chávez utilized collective action toward a common goal. A community led by God, all shouting the same message, can create a just society to end suffering here on Earth.

Click the links below to hear his interview

https://soundcloud.com/archiving-living-history/chris-hartmire-interview (Introduction)

https://soundcloud.com/archiving-living-history/chris-hartmire-interview-track (Track 2)

— 9 months ago
#civil rights movement  #labor struggles  #California Migrant Ministry  #migrant farm workers  #césar chávez  #Community Service Organization  #Farm Workers Movement 
Jane “Pudge” Hartmire - The Farm Workers Movement, in the 1960’s and 1970’s led by Cesar Chavez, ignited unionization efforts for justice, respect, better wages, and living and working conditions for farm workers. Jane worked with her husband in the Farm Workers Movement as a nurse, a mother with four children, a wife of a Presbyterian minister, a political activist developing community service, fighting race and class injustices, and a feminist in the Civil Rights Movement and The Cold War. Born in 1932 in Philadelphia, PA Jane was raised in an upper class home, training in church, race equality, and service in Quaker work camps, settlement houses, counseling for disadvantaged kids, with a mindset of service. After her children went to college, Jane and her husband moved to the Farm Workers headquarters, in Tehachapi, CA, where she ran the Farm Worker health clinics, and accompanied rallies and marches because of the “rightness of the cause.” Cesar Chavez led the march to Sacramento, CA to bring attention to the farm workers with his fasting, community support, non-violence, and religious stubbornness. Her advice for young women: choose carefully who you marry and be an organizer and leader utilizing the increased advantages for women in this day and age.  

Jane “Pudge” Hartmire - The Farm Workers Movement, in the 1960’s and 1970’s led by Cesar Chavez, ignited unionization efforts for justice, respect, better wages, and living and working conditions for farm workers. Jane worked with her husband in the Farm Workers Movement as a nurse, a mother with four children, a wife of a Presbyterian minister, a political activist developing community service, fighting race and class injustices, and a feminist in the Civil Rights Movement and The Cold War. Born in 1932 in Philadelphia, PA Jane was raised in an upper class home, training in church, race equality, and service in Quaker work camps, settlement houses, counseling for disadvantaged kids, with a mindset of service. After her children went to college, Jane and her husband moved to the Farm Workers headquarters, in Tehachapi, CA, where she ran the Farm Worker health clinics, and accompanied rallies and marches because of the “rightness of the cause.” Cesar Chavez led the march to Sacramento, CA to bring attention to the farm workers with his fasting, community support, non-violence, and religious stubbornness. Her advice for young women: choose carefully who you marry and be an organizer and leader utilizing the increased advantages for women in this day and age.  

— 9 months ago
#civil rights movement  #unionization  #service training  #headquarters for farm workers  #march across california  #cesar chavez 
Donna Ambrogi was born April 18, 1929 in St. Paul, Minnesota. She grew up in Huntington Park, California during World War II. Her family was Jewish and supported political work against discrimination. She was baptized a Christian, and in 1957 Donna received a Fulbright Grant to study ecumenism in Europe and the U.S. She was involved with Catholic-Protestant dialogue, and facilitated cooperation between Catholic lay people and Protestant clergy. In 1963-64, Donna participated in civil rights work with members of the Grail, attending the March on Washington, civil rights activism in Boston and her first arrest during a sit-in in Williamston, North Carolina. Her studies continued at the Ecumenical Institute, in 1966 at Bossey, Switzerland, with a World Council of Churches internship in Scotland. She was the first woman on staff at the Jesuit Theologate, Los Gatos, California, “always the token woman.” Her work led her to participate in a post-Vatican II meeting at Notre Dame, the only woman in all male Catholic-Protestant dialogue group, where she met her husband, clergyman Tom Ambrogi.
Click the links below to hear her interview
https://soundcloud.com/archiving-living-history/donna-ambrogi-interview (Introduction)
https://soundcloud.com/archiving-living-history/donna-ambrogi-interview-track (Track 2)

Donna Ambrogi was born April 18, 1929 in St. Paul, Minnesota. She grew up in Huntington Park, California during World War II. Her family was Jewish and supported political work against discrimination. She was baptized a Christian, and in 1957 Donna received a Fulbright Grant to study ecumenism in Europe and the U.S. She was involved with Catholic-Protestant dialogue, and facilitated cooperation between Catholic lay people and Protestant clergy. In 1963-64, Donna participated in civil rights work with members of the Grail, attending the March on Washington, civil rights activism in Boston and her first arrest during a sit-in in Williamston, North Carolina. Her studies continued at the Ecumenical Institute, in 1966 at Bossey, Switzerland, with a World Council of Churches internship in Scotland. She was the first woman on staff at the Jesuit Theologate, Los Gatos, California, “always the token woman.” Her work led her to participate in a post-Vatican II meeting at Notre Dame, the only woman in all male Catholic-Protestant dialogue group, where she met her husband, clergyman Tom Ambrogi.

Click the links below to hear her interview

https://soundcloud.com/archiving-living-history/donna-ambrogi-interview (Introduction)

https://soundcloud.com/archiving-living-history/donna-ambrogi-interview-track (Track 2)

— 9 months ago
#civil rights movement  #ecumenical studies  #catholic-protestant dialogue  #the grail  #jewish political work  #march on washington 1963